Writing Tips 101: Understanding Your Craft and Capabilities



So many people think about writing a book – whether it’s an autobiography, a look into some amazing aspect of reality, the next great piece of literature, or a fantastic adventure.


But very few actually start one. Even fewer finish a full manuscript, to say nothing about getting published.


More often than not, that’s because they don’t have the proper starting point to work from. They think they can just sit down and the words will flow freely.


Then they get frustrated when the process proves to be a bit more difficult than that.


So here’s some insider’s insight…



Yes, the writing process does require commitment. But even that can be fun. Truly, accomplishing your publishing goals doesn’t have to be one giant headache. It’s not all struggling to know what to write and feeling foolish when you fall short.


Far from it.


While successful book writers do experience writer’s block at times or look back at past pages and want to throw them all out the window, we also understand the basics of our craft.


We recognize that it’s not just the whats, whens and whys that matter when working on a novel or nonfiction manuscript. It’s also the hows and wheres that come in handy when trying to create something amazing.


If you want to join the small but powerful group of people who can proudly say they’ve written their own novel, pay attention!


This is how to start.

Pop quiz time.


Do you typically do best when you’re organized or when you’re unrestricted? In other words, are you the type of person who feels the best and accomplishes the most when:


A. You know exactly what you’re doing to do and how you’re going to do it? You’re the type of person who likes writing outlines and making organizational charts and designing bulletted lists to direct you step by step. B. You get to be spontaneous and make stuff up as you go along? You prefer to let your imagination roam freely to choose whatever directions and possibilities it can.


Eeenie meenie miney moe?


Before you panic, let me assure you… There isn’t a universal “correct” answer. This is one of those areas of the creative writing world where it’s more than okay to be one or the other depending on which suits your style.

If you’re the organized type, then you’re what’s known as a plotter. Plotters want to know where their stories start out, what they do in each chapter, and how they end. And they want to know all of that before they start writing their actual stories.


If you’re the organized type, then you’re what’s known as a plotter. Plotters want to know where their stories start out, what they do in each chapter, and how they end. And they want to know all of that before they start writing anything official.


If you’re the spontaneous type, then you’re a pantser (i.e., you fly by the seat of your pants). Pansters oftentimes don’t have a clue how their stories are going to end. They just write, and whatever ends up on the paper ends up on the paper: They’ll deal with it after they’ve finished their first draft.


If a plotter tries to pants it, he’s probably going to get very frustrated because that style feels downright wrong.


And he’d be right there. It is wrong.


For him.


Likewise, a pantser trying to plot is bound to feel unnatural and even irritated, because that’s not how her creative side works best.


This is why determining which group you fall into is so important. It can smooth out your journey significantly, giving you a much greater chance that you’ll reach your intended publishable destination.


One final note on the subject: It’s alright if you find yourself falling somewhere between the two archetypes, Again, this isn’t about being “right.” It’s about figuring out how to make the most of your creative abilities.


Want to know more about giving yourself every advantage to start and finish your story? Download the free “Writing Tips 101” report right now.


I genuinely don't think you'll regret it...

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