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How to Handle Negative Reader Feedback


Podcast Audio Link: Click here.

Podcast Transcript: Hi, genuine writers! This is Innovative Editing’s Jeannette DiLouie welcoming you to episode #17 of The Genuine Writer Podcast. We keep things short, sweet and to the point here so that you can learn what you need to learn and get back to writing already.

Today’s episode is sponsored by Don’t Dread Dialogue Writing: How to Construct Your Character Lines Convincingly. I described it last week as containing great information on what dialogue is supposed to be and what it’s not supposed to be. And guess what? That’s still true this week. So if this is an area you need to improve in, I really would recommend snapping up a copy for yourself. It’s just $2.99, and I’ll make sure to link to it in the description section below.

Then there’s The Genuine Writer e-letter. That one’s completely free. It goes out every Tuesday to encourage you into being the best kind of writer you can be: an informed, honest and engaging one. You can sign up for it by going to www.InnovativeEditing.com, then scrolling down to The Genuine Writer sign-up box and entering in your email address.

Here’s an extra bonus to signing up: You’ll always know when I have Lia Mack, author of Waiting for Paint to Dry, as a guest on this podcast. Which, for the record, she is right now. Yay! She’s here to help me discuss a very peculiar phenomenon that I’ve noticed more than once on the Facebook writers groups I belong to. Honestly, this is a giant pet peeve of mine: when an indie author will post something along the lines of, “I just got my very first one-star review! Wahoo! Now I’m a real writer!” or “I guess I’ve really made it now!”

How in the world is getting a one-star review a sign of really making it? Seriously? A one-star review is either a learning opportunity to reflect and grow from someone’s horrible opinion of what you wrote. Or it’s a learning opportunity to grow thicker skin. But I don’t see how in the world it’s anything indicative of being an authorial Pinocchio. “I’m a real author now!”

Okay. Since I could keep ranting about this for a very long time, I’m going to turn this monologue into a dialogue by asking Lia to weigh in. What do you think about it? Crazy or does it make sense...

Being that this was a dialogue and not a monologue, featuring a transcript is too much for this technologically inept and cheap creative writer to handle. So if you want the whole thing, you're just going to have to listen to it right here.

Otherwise, that’s it for this week! Thank you for tuning in to The Genuine Writer Podcast. It was awesome to have you here and I’ll catch you all next week. Until then, very happy writing!


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